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New York Rangers

NHL New York Rangers

An Original Six Team

The New York Rangers hockey team is one of the most storied franchises in the NHL. An Original Six team, the Rangers were created in 1926, in a league expansion that also included the Chicago Black Hawks and Detroit Cougars. It didn’t take long for the new team to enjoy success: The Rangers won the Stanley Cup in 1927-28, making them the first U.S. team to win top NHL honors.

The New York Rangers History

The New York Rangers team was founded by George Lewis “Tex” Rickard, president of Madison Square Garden as well as a successful boxing promoter, casino operator and professional gambler. Early on, the team was known locally as Tex’s Rangers and the Broadway Blueshirts, with their players having become highly popular thanks to their Stanley Cup win in 1927-28.

After a division title in 1931-32, the Rangers endured a lengthy dry spell throughout the 1940s, ’50s and ’60s. However, after winning the Stanley Cup in 1993-94, the Rangers have been on the upswing — a solid contender year in and year out in recent years.

Rangers team colors are blue, red and white. The Rangers primary logo has changed very little throughout its history, with NEW YORK at the top of a shield and RANGERS running diagonally across the shield’s center area.

An enduring logo is not the only long-lasting facet of the Rangers organization. The team continues, to this day, to play home games in Madison Square Garden, and is still owned by the Madison Square Garden Company.

Notable Rangers Hockey Team and Individual Accomplishments

  • The four New York Rangers championships: 1927-28, 1932-33, 1939-40 and 1993-94.
  • In addition to those four Stanley Cups, the Rangers own two conference championships and seven division championships.
  • In the Hockey Hall of Fame, you’ll find 49 players and nine builders of the sport associated with the Rangers. Hall of Famers include:
    • Eric Lindros, the high-scoring power forward, inducted in 2016.
    • Wayne Gretzky, who played for the Rangers in his final three seasons (1996-97, 1997-98 and 1998-99).
    • Mark Messier, who played 10 seasons with the Rangers, including their championship season in 1993-94.
    • Bryan Hextall, Rangers goalie through most of the 1930s and ’40s, whose sons and grandson Ron Hextall were also NHL standouts.
    • Jean Ratelle, Rangers center who retired in 1980-81 as the NHL’s sixth-leading all-time scorer.
    • Brad Park, Rangers legend who currently stands at #13 in all-time scoring for a defenseman.
    • Brian Leetch, another superstar who owns a host of Rangers defenseman scoring records and was a team leader during its resurgence in the 1990s.
  • The New York Rangers hockey team has retired nine numbers:
    • Eddie Giacomin, goalie, number retired in 1989.
    • Brian Leetch, defenseman, number retired in 2008.
    • Harry Howell, defenseman, number retired in 2009.
    • Rod Gilbert, right winger, number retired in 1979.
    • Andy Bathgate, right winger, number retired in 2009.
    • Adam Graves, left winger, number retired in 2009.
    • Mark Messier, center, number retired in 2006.
    • Jean Ratelle, center, number retired in 2018.
    • Mike Richter, goalie, number retired in 2004.
  • A few other New York Rangers achievements worth remembering:
    • Frank Boucher, center of the Rangers’ legendary 1920s and ’30s “Bread Line,” was the first winner of the Lady Byng Trophy, and won it a total of seven times — more than any other NHL player.
    • Two Rangers goalies shared the Vezina Trophy in 1970-71: Eddie Giacomin and Gilles Villemure. The duo combined for a 2.26 goals-against average in a season that saw the Rangers post a team-best 49 wins and 109 points.
    • Rangers career records of note:
      • Most goals — Rod Gilbert, 406
      • Most assists — Brian Leetch, 741
      • Most points — Rod Gilbert, 1,021
      • Most goalie wins — Henrik Lundqvist, 431 (and counting)
      • Most shutouts — Henrik Ludqvist, 63 (and counting)